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mikerugnetta:

chels:

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 


Glitch art goes interstellar.

good morning

mikerugnetta:

chels:

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

Glitch art goes interstellar.

good morning

newyorker
newyorker:

Lawrence Krauss on a scientific breakthrough that enables us to see the afterglow of the Big Bang: http://nyr.kr/No82A2

"For some people, the possibility that the laws of physics might illuminate even the creation of our own universe, without the need for supernatural intervention or any demonstration of purpose, is truly terrifying. But Monday’s announcement heralds the possible beginning of a new era, where even such cosmic existential questions are becoming accessible to experiment."

Photograph: Steffen Richter/Harvard University

newyorker:

Lawrence Krauss on a scientific breakthrough that enables us to see the afterglow of the Big Bang: http://nyr.kr/No82A2


"For some people, the possibility that the laws of physics might illuminate even the creation of our own universe, without the need for supernatural intervention or any demonstration of purpose, is truly terrifying. But Monday’s announcement heralds the possible beginning of a new era, where even such cosmic existential questions are becoming accessible to experiment."

Photograph: Steffen Richter/Harvard University