propagandery

propagandery:

NASA Physicist Imagines a Warp-Speed Spaceship

Thanks to a NASA physicist, the notion of warp speed might just travel out of sci-fi and into the real world.

NASA’s Harold White has been working since 2010 to develop a warp drive that will allow spacecraft to travel at speeds faster than light — 186,000 miles per second.

White, who heads NASA’s Advanced Propulsion Team, spoke about his conceptual starship at a conference last fall. But interest in his project reached a new level this week when he unveiled images of what the craft might look like.

Created by artist Mark Rademaker, who based them on White’s designs, the images show a technologically detailed spacecraft that wouldn’t look out of place in a “Star Trek” movie. Rademaker says creating them took more than 1,600 hours.

At the SpaceVision 2013 Space Conference last November in Phoenix, White talked about his design, the concepts behind it and the progress that’s been made in warp-drive development over the decades. He discussed the idea of a “space warp,” a loophole in the theory of general relativity that would allow for massive distances to be traveled very quickly, reducing travel times from thousands of years to days.

In his speech, White described space warps as faraway galaxies that can bend light around them. They work on the principle of bending space both in front of and behind a spacecraft. This would essentially allow for the empty space behind the craft to expand, both pushing and pulling it forward at the same time. The concept is similar to that of an escalator or moving walkway.

"There’s no speed limit on the expansion and contraction of space," White said at the conference. “You can actually find a way to get around what I like to call the 11th commandment: Thou shall not exceed the speed of light.”

crookedindifference
crookedindifference:

Astronauts Pay a Visit to Surveyor 3 

On April 17, 1967, NASA’s Surveyor 3 spacecraft launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on a mission to the lunar surface. A little more than two years after it landed on the moon with the goal of paving the way for a future human mission, the Surveyor 3 spacecraft got a visit from Apollo 12 Commander Charles Conrad Jr. and astronaut Alan L. Bean, who snapped this photo on November 20, 1969. 
After Surveyor 1’s initial studies of the lunar surface in 1966, Surveyor 3 made further inroads into preparations for human missions to the moon. Using a surface sampler to study the lunar soil, Surveyor 3 conducted experiments to see how the lunar surface would fare against the weight of an Apollo lunar module. The moon lander, which was the second of the Surveyor series to make a soft landing on the moon, also gathered information on the lunar soil’s radar reflectivity and thermal properties in addition to transmitting more than 6,000 photographs of its surroundings.
The Apollo 12 Lunar Module, visible in the background at right, landed about 600 feet from Surveyor 3 in the Ocean of Storms. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Here, Conrad examines the Surveyor’s TV camera prior to detaching it. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon.

crookedindifference:

Astronauts Pay a Visit to Surveyor 3 

On April 17, 1967, NASA’s Surveyor 3 spacecraft launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on a mission to the lunar surface. A little more than two years after it landed on the moon with the goal of paving the way for a future human mission, the Surveyor 3 spacecraft got a visit from Apollo 12 Commander Charles Conrad Jr. and astronaut Alan L. Bean, who snapped this photo on November 20, 1969.

After Surveyor 1’s initial studies of the lunar surface in 1966, Surveyor 3 made further inroads into preparations for human missions to the moon. Using a surface sampler to study the lunar soil, Surveyor 3 conducted experiments to see how the lunar surface would fare against the weight of an Apollo lunar module. The moon lander, which was the second of the Surveyor series to make a soft landing on the moon, also gathered information on the lunar soil’s radar reflectivity and thermal properties in addition to transmitting more than 6,000 photographs of its surroundings.

The Apollo 12 Lunar Module, visible in the background at right, landed about 600 feet from Surveyor 3 in the Ocean of Storms. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Here, Conrad examines the Surveyor’s TV camera prior to detaching it. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon.

clayrodery

clayrodery:

Life is Elsewhere (La Vie Est Ailleurs)



On June 12 I will be participating in La GIF Party - a celebration of French magazine Kiblind's 10th anniversary.  Partnered with studio Superscript ², Kiblind is celebrating by exhibiting a “GIF galaxy” of 12 artists.  I was honored to have been selected as one of them, and got the chance to make some new work for the exhibition party, which will take place on two separate occasions.  The first night will show at Le Sucre, in Lyon, France on June 12, and a second night in Paris at Le Point Éphémère on June 19th.

I really wish I could go myself, but if anyone is in Lyon or Paris and is looking for something to do then, check it out and let me know if you had a good time!  Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/552617621525588/?ref=22

Super-thanks to Kiblind!

theatlantic
theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

crookedindifference
crookedindifference:

Most Colorful View of Universe Captured by Hubble Space Telescope

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have assembled a comprehensive picture of the evolving universe – among the most colorful deep space images ever captured by the 24-year-old telescope. Researchers say the image, in new study called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, provides the missing link in star formation. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2014 image is a composite of separate exposures taken in 2003 to 2012 with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3.

crookedindifference:

Most Colorful View of Universe Captured by Hubble Space Telescope

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have assembled a comprehensive picture of the evolving universe – among the most colorful deep space images ever captured by the 24-year-old telescope. Researchers say the image, in new study called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, provides the missing link in star formation. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2014 image is a composite of separate exposures taken in 2003 to 2012 with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3.

The Airbus Defence and Space agency has released images taken by both Pleiades satellites that show final stages of construction or renovation of all 12 stadiums to host the 2014 FIFA World Cup, in Brazil. The high resolution images were taken between 2012 and 2014 and are available for download here.

From top to bottom, Brasília’s Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha, Natal’s Arena das Dunas and Arena Pernambuco, in Recife.

vicemag

vicemag:

Edgar Martins Explores the European Space Agency

Edgar Martins spent the past two years exploring the facilities of the European Space Agency (ESA) and photographing the weird, clinical spaces he came across. His project marks the first time in the ESA’s history that an artist has been granted exclusive access to the agency’s staff, programs, and technology. The resulting series looks like a mood board for the sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Born in the late 1970s, Edgar wasn’t a child of the space race, but he’s always been enthralled by the Apollo program. “I grew up wanting to become an astronaut—not an easy accomplishment for a European in communist China—and still have recurring dreams where I’m propelled into space, though can never remember how,” he says. “In the dream, I get into Earth’s orbit, float in zero G, look down at the planet for the first time from afar, and become overwhelmed with the experience.

"Space and all the mysticism and technological marvels that surround it have an immeasurable resonance on our social and individual consciousness. It’s a topic that constantly throws me, and us, into the antinomies of perception and existence, toward the exploration of boundaries and unstable geometries."

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