Aurora seen in Arkansas last night

Arkansas storm chaser Brian Emfinger, author of the aurora video and photos, had this to say:

"What an incredible display last night! I just happended to check out spaceweather.com around 8pm and saw that aurora were being seen in Ohio so I thought I would throw my camera outside and see if it picked up anything. The first image had some very light auroras which put me into a immediate panic as to where I should go. I decided to just run out into the field and within just about 10-20 minutes the auroras went crazy. I had lots of problems with the auroras being overexposed… I obviously havent had a lot of practice! Here is a time lapse of the aurora explosion… and again… this is from ARKANSAS!"

From the Washington Post weather blog: Aurora (northern lights) seen in more than half United States.

Aurora Over Greenland
Image Credit: Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (TWAN)
This aurora arched from horizon to horizon. During the current Shelios expedition to observe and learn about the northern lights, the sky last weekend did not disappoint. After sunset and some careful photographic planning, the above image was taken from the expedition’s Qaleraliq campsite in southern Greenland. Visible straight through the center of the aurora, found with a careful eye, is the Big Dipper and the surrounding constellation of the Big Bear (Ursa Major). The brightest orb on the far right is the Moon, while Jupiter can be seen even further to the right. The Shelios expedition is scheduled to last until the end of August and include live broadcasts of ongoing auroras. (via APOD: 2011 August 23 - Aurora Over Greenland)

Aurora Over Greenland

Image Credit: Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (TWAN)

This aurora arched from horizon to horizon. During the current Shelios expedition to observe and learn about the northern lights, the sky last weekend did not disappoint. After sunset and some careful photographic planning, the above image was taken from the expedition’s Qaleraliq campsite in southern Greenland. Visible straight through the center of the aurora, found with a careful eye, is the Big Dipper and the surrounding constellation of the Big Bear (Ursa Major). The brightest orb on the far right is the Moon, while Jupiter can be seen even further to the right. The Shelios expedition is scheduled to last until the end of August and include live broadcasts of ongoing auroras. (via APOD: 2011 August 23 - Aurora Over Greenland)

For the past five nights in a row, sky watchers around the Arctic Circle have witnessed green luminous tendrils dancing across the waning twilight of summer. It’s safe to say: Aurora season has begun. Here is the view from Arjeplog, Sweden, just after midnight on August 27th.
"The sky cleared up at midnight and I went out to have a quick look for Northern Lights," says photographer Nenne Åman. "The sky turned green just as I reached the shores of Lake Hornavan—perfect timing. This was my first aurora this season, so I am very happy at the moment!"

For the past five nights in a row, sky watchers around the Arctic Circle have witnessed green luminous tendrils dancing across the waning twilight of summer. It’s safe to say: Aurora season has begun. Here is the view from Arjeplog, Sweden, just after midnight on August 27th.

"The sky cleared up at midnight and I went out to have a quick look for Northern Lights," says photographer Nenne Åman. "The sky turned green just as I reached the shores of Lake Hornavan—perfect timing. This was my first aurora this season, so I am very happy at the moment!"

This panoramic view from the International Space Station, looking past the docked shuttle Atlantis’ cargo bay and part of the station including a solar array panel toward Earth, was taken on July 14, 2011 as the spacecraft passed over the Southern Hemisphere. Aurora Australis or the Southern Lights can be seen on Earth’s horizon and a number of stars are visible also.
CREDIT: NASA

This panoramic view from the International Space Station, looking past the docked shuttle Atlantis’ cargo bay and part of the station including a solar array panel toward Earth, was taken on July 14, 2011 as the spacecraft passed over the Southern Hemisphere. Aurora Australis or the Southern Lights can be seen on Earth’s horizon and a number of stars are visible also.

CREDIT: NASA

Aurora Over AlaskaCredit & Copyright: Paul Alsop
Explanation: Are those green clouds or aurora? Photographed above two weeks ago, puffy green aurora help the Moon illuminate the serene Willow Lake and the snowy Wrangell and Saint Elias Mountains in eastern Alaska, USA. Although auroras might first appear to be moonlit clouds, they only add light to the sky and do not block background stars from view. Called northern lights in the northern hemisphere, auroras are caused by collisions between charged particles from the magnetosphere and air molecules high in the Earth’s atmosphere. If viewed from space, auroras can be seen to glow in X-ray and ultraviolet light as well. Predictable auroras likely occur a few days after a powerful magnetic event has been seen on the Sun.

Aurora Over Alaska
Credit & Copyright: Paul Alsop

Explanation: Are those green clouds or aurora? Photographed above two weeks ago, puffy green aurora help the Moon illuminate the serene Willow Lake and the snowy Wrangell and Saint Elias Mountains in eastern AlaskaUSA. Although auroras might first appear to be moonlit clouds, they only add light to the sky and do not block background stars from view. Called northern lights in the northern hemisphere, auroras are caused by collisions between charged particles from the magnetosphere and air molecules high in the Earth’s atmosphere. If viewed from space, auroras can be seen to glow in X-ray and ultraviolet light as well. Predictable auroras likely occur a few days after a powerful magnetic event has been seen on the Sun.

The Dancing Auroras of SaturnCredit: VIMS Team, JPL, ESA, NASA
Explanation: What drives auroras on Saturn? To help find out, scientists have sorted through hundreds of infrared images of Saturn taken by the Cassini spacecraft for other purposes, trying to find enough aurora images to correlate changes and make movies. Once made, some movies clearly show that Saturnian auroras can change not only with the angle of the Sun, but also as the planet rotates. Furthermore, some auroral changes appear related to waves in Saturn’s magnetosphere likely caused by Saturn’s moons. Pictured above, a false-colored image taken in 2007 shows Saturn in three bands of infrared light. The rings reflect relatively blue sunlight, while the planet itself glows in comparatively low energy red. A band of southern aurora in visible in green. Inspection of many more Saturnian images may well lead to an even better understanding of both Saturn’s and Earth’s auroras.

The Dancing Auroras of Saturn
Credit: VIMS Team, JPLESANASA

Explanation: What drives auroras on Saturn? To help find out, scientists have sorted through hundreds of infrared images of Saturn taken by the Cassini spacecraft for other purposes, trying to find enough aurora images to correlate changes and make movies. Once made, some movies clearly show that Saturnian auroras can change not only with the angle of the Sun, but also as the planet rotates. Furthermore, some auroral changes appear related to waves in Saturn’s magnetosphere likely caused by Saturn’s moons. Pictured above, a false-colored image taken in 2007 shows Saturn in three bands of infrared light. The rings reflect relatively blue sunlight, while the planet itself glows in comparatively low energy red. A band of southern aurora in visible in green. Inspection of many more Saturnian images may well lead to an even better understanding of both Saturn’s and Earth’s auroras.

Aurora Over NorwayCredit & Copyright: Ole Christian Salomonsen
Explanation: Auroras can make spectacular sights. Photographed above last weekend, flowing multi-colored auroras helped illuminate a busy sky above Tromsø, Norway. Besides the spectacular aurora pictured above, the photographer caught three satellites streaks, one airplane streak, and a friend trying to capture the same sight. Although auroras might first appear to be moonlit clouds, they only add light to the sky and do not block background stars from view. Called northern lights in the northern hemisphere, auroras are caused by collisions between charged particles from the magnetosphere and air molecules high in the Earth’s atmosphere. If viewed from space, auroras can be seen to glow in X-ray and ultraviolet light as well. Predictable auroras might occur a few days after a powerful magnetic event has been seen on the Sun.

Aurora Over Norway
Credit & Copyright: Ole Christian Salomonsen

Explanation: Auroras can make spectacular sights. Photographed above last weekend, flowing multi-colored auroras helped illuminate a busy sky above TromsøNorway. Besides the spectacular aurora pictured above, the photographer caught three satellites streaks, one airplane streak, and a friend trying to capture the same sight. Although auroras might first appear to be moonlit clouds, they only add light to the sky and do not block background stars from view. Called northern lights in the northern hemisphere, auroras are caused by collisions between charged particles from the magnetosphere and air molecules high in the Earth’s atmosphere. If viewed from space, auroras can be seen to glow in X-ray and ultraviolet light as well. Predictable auroras might occur a few days after a powerful magnetic event has been seen on the Sun.

Northern Lights over Prelude LakeImage Credit and Copyright: Yuichi Takasaka / TWAN / www.blue-moon.ca 
Explanation: Curtains of shimmering green light sprawl across this gorgeous night skyscape. In the foreground lies the peaceful Prelude Lake, located about 30 kilometers east of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. From high northern latitudes these mesmerizing northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis, are becoming a more familiar sight. As the September 23rd equinox approaches, nights grow longer and a favorable season for aurora begins. Recorded on September 11, this panoramic scene spans about 180 degrees. Brighter stars peering through the auroral glow at the left form the recognizable northern asterism, the Big Dipper. A more compact Pleiades star cluster shines at the far right.

Northern Lights over Prelude Lake
Image Credit and CopyrightYuichi Takasaka / TWAN / www.blue-moon.ca 

Explanation: Curtains of shimmering green light sprawl across this gorgeous night skyscape. In the foreground lies the peaceful Prelude Lake, located about 30 kilometers east of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. From high northern latitudes these mesmerizing northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis, are becoming a more familiar sight. As the September 23rd equinox approaches, nights grow longer and a favorable season for aurora begins. Recorded on September 11, this panoramic scene spans about 180 degrees. Brighter stars peering through the auroral glow at the left form the recognizable northern asterism, the Big Dipper. A more compact Pleiades star cluster shines at the far right.