Engineers dressed in Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble, or SCAPE suits, fuel Planck with liquid hydrazine on 15 April 2009. 

Planck will use its thrusters, propelled by liquid hydrazine, for manoeuvres once in orbit. This is a volatile and toxic substance, commonly used as rocket fuel. The critical fuelling operations required plenty of preparation, including safety training exercises for the fuelling team, and was executed with great care.

(via ESA)

Engineers dressed in Self-Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble, or SCAPE suits, fuel Planck with liquid hydrazine on 15 April 2009.

Planck will use its thrusters, propelled by liquid hydrazine, for manoeuvres once in orbit. This is a volatile and toxic substance, commonly used as rocket fuel. The critical fuelling operations required plenty of preparation, including safety training exercises for the fuelling team, and was executed with great care.

(via ESA)

What a lunar eclipse looks like… FROM THE MOON.

This image was taken by the Japanese lunar explorer KAGUYA. I love the description given by Phil Plait of Discover magazine’s Bad Astronomy blog:
Usually, the diamond ring effect is seen in a solar eclipse, when the Moon blocks the Sun as seen from Earth. Sunlight peaks around lunar mountains and valleys, creating what looks like a wedding ring in the sky. But not this time: that’s the Earth’s atmosphere lit up, a circle of a sunlight, a ring of a thousand simultaneous sunrises and sunsets.

This shot is actually a still frame from a video the KAGUYA probe took of the event, which can be seen here.

Image Credit: JAXA/NHK
What a lunar eclipse looks like… FROM THE MOON.

This image was taken by the Japanese lunar explorer KAGUYA. I love the description given by Phil Plait of Discover magazine’s Bad Astronomy blog:

Usually, the diamond ring effect is seen in a solar eclipse, when the Moon blocks the Sun as seen from Earth. Sunlight peaks around lunar mountains and valleys, creating what looks like a wedding ring in the sky. But not this time: that’s the Earth’s atmosphere lit up, a circle of a sunlight, a ring of a thousand simultaneous sunrises and sunsets.
This shot is actually a still frame from a video the KAGUYA probe took of the event, which can be seen here. Image Credit: JAXA/NHK