Brazil´s most preserved meteor crater to be considered National Natural Heritage

The crater, located in Tocantins, central Brazil, is 8 miles wide (13 km). According to NASA, this is Brazil´s most preserved meteor crater, but second biggest. The bigger one, also in central Brazil, is 25 miles wide (40 km).

The crater, seen in satellite photo above, is known since 1973 and is about to be considered National Natural Heritage for it helps to tell the planet´s geological history.

The second picture shows the border of the crater and its 0,25 mile height (400 meters).

Source: G1.

scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

Most of the craters on the Moon formed through impact processes. However, some craters, like the one visible in this portion of LROC NAC frame M131488521R, may be a volcano summit pit crater. Crater diameter is ~400 m, the image width is 923 m, and illumination is from the right
Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University
Source: Volcanoes in Lacus Mortis, The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC)

scienceisbeauty:

Most of the craters on the Moon formed through impact processes. However, some craters, like the one visible in this portion of LROC NAC frame M131488521R, may be a volcano summit pit crater. Crater diameter is ~400 m, the image width is 923 m, and illumination is from the right

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

Source: Volcanoes in Lacus Mortis, The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC)

A Double Ringed Basin On Mercury
What created the internal second ring of this double ringed basin on Mercury? No one is sure. The unusual feature spans 160 kilometers and was imaged during the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft’s swing past our Solar System’s innermost planet last week. Double and multiple ringed basins, although rare, have also been imaged in years past on Mars, Venus, Earth, and Earth’s Moon.
Image credit: NASA/JHU APL/CIW
(via APOD)

A Double Ringed Basin On Mercury

What created the internal second ring of this double ringed basin on Mercury? No one is sure. The unusual feature spans 160 kilometers and was imaged during the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft’s swing past our Solar System’s innermost planet last week. Double and multiple ringed basins, although rare, have also been imaged in years past on Mars, Venus, Earth, and Earth’s Moon.

Image credit: NASA/JHU APL/CIW

(via APOD)

On Oct 9th (nominal time 11:30 UTC), NASA’s LCROSS mission will crash into the Cabeus A crater on the lunar surface.
The LCROSS mission is a search for water on the moon. The LCROSS mission is going to do this by sending a rocket crashing into the moon causing a big impact and creating a crater, throwing tons of debris and potentially water ice and vapor above the lunar surface. This impact will release materials from the lunar surface that will be analyzed for the presence of hydrated minerals which would tell researchers if water is there or not. The two main components of the LCROSS mission are the Shepherding Spacecraft (S-S/C) and the Centaur upper stage rocket. The Shepherding Spacecraft guides the rocket to a site selected on the moon that has a high probability of containing water. Because they have only one chance with this mission in finding water, the researchers have to be very precise where they program the Shepherding Spacecraft to guide the rocket.
This crash will be so big that we on Earth may be able to view the resulting plume of material it ejects with a good amateur telescope.

On Oct 9th (nominal time 11:30 UTC), NASA’s LCROSS mission will crash into the Cabeus A crater on the lunar surface.

The LCROSS mission is a search for water on the moon. The LCROSS mission is going to do this by sending a rocket crashing into the moon causing a big impact and creating a crater, throwing tons of debris and potentially water ice and vapor above the lunar surface. This impact will release materials from the lunar surface that will be analyzed for the presence of hydrated minerals which would tell researchers if water is there or not. The two main components of the LCROSS mission are the Shepherding Spacecraft (S-S/C) and the Centaur upper stage rocket. The Shepherding Spacecraft guides the rocket to a site selected on the moon that has a high probability of containing water. Because they have only one chance with this mission in finding water, the researchers have to be very precise where they program the Shepherding Spacecraft to guide the rocket.

This crash will be so big that we on Earth may be able to view the resulting plume of material it ejects with a good amateur telescope.