APOD: Sunrise, Moonrise
Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Pölzl
Explanation: For many Europeans, the Sun and New Moon rose together on January 4 in a partial solar eclipse. Arriving close on the heels of the new year, it was the first of a series of four(!) partial solar eclipses due in 2011. This composite image documents the graceful celestial event in colorful morning skies over Graz, Austria. Beginning before sunrise, frames were taken to record the position and progress of the eclipse every 15 minutes. As Sun and Moon rose above the eastern horizon, the town of Graz is seen bathed in warming sunlight only partially blocked by the New Moon, spreading beneath the town’s landmark clock tower.

APOD: Sunrise, Moonrise

Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Pölzl

Explanation: For many Europeans, the Sun and New Moon rose together on January 4 in a partial solar eclipse. Arriving close on the heels of the new year, it was the first of a series of four(!) partial solar eclipses due in 2011. This composite image documents the graceful celestial event in colorful morning skies over Graz, Austria. Beginning before sunrise, frames were taken to record the position and progress of the eclipse every 15 minutes. As Sun and Moon rose above the eastern horizon, the town of Graz is seen bathed in warming sunlight only partially blocked by the New Moon, spreading beneath the town’s landmark clock tower.

Solar Eclipse Tomorrow: Europe to See Crescent Sunrise?
The moon will appear to take a bite out of the sun tomorrow during the first of four partial solar eclipses slated to happen in 2011. Sky-watchers across most of continental Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia will be able to see the celestial event.
Solar eclipses occur when Earth, the moon, and the sun are aligned so that—as seen from Earth—the moon appears to cover all or part of the sun’s disk.
Above, a partial solar eclipse, seen over Taipei, Taiwan, last January.
Read more.

Solar Eclipse Tomorrow: Europe to See Crescent Sunrise?

The moon will appear to take a bite out of the sun tomorrow during the first of four partial solar eclipses slated to happen in 2011. Sky-watchers across most of continental Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia will be able to see the celestial event.

Solar eclipses occur when Earth, the moon, and the sun are aligned so that—as seen from Earth—the moon appears to cover all or part of the sun’s disk.

Above, a partial solar eclipse, seen over Taipei, Taiwan, last January.

Read more.

APOD: Eclipse at Moonset
Image Credit & Copyright: Itahisa N. González (Grupo de Observadores Astronómicos de Tenerife)
Explanation: Hugging the horizon, a dark red Moon greeted early morning skygazers in eastern Atlantic regions on December 21, as the total phase of 2010’s Solstice Lunar Eclipse began near moonset. This well composed image of the geocentric celestial event is a composite of multiple exposures following the progression of the eclipse from Tenerife, Canary Islands. Initially reflecting brightly on a sea of clouds and the ocean’s surface itself, the Moon sinks deeper into eclipse as it moves from left to right across the sky. Opposite the Sun, the Moon was immersed in the darkest part of Earth’s shadow as it approached the western horizon, just before sunrise came to Tenerife.

APOD: Eclipse at Moonset

Image Credit & Copyright: Itahisa N. González (Grupo de Observadores Astronómicos de Tenerife)

Explanation: Hugging the horizon, a dark red Moon greeted early morning skygazers in eastern Atlantic regions on December 21, as the total phase of 2010’s Solstice Lunar Eclipse began near moonset. This well composed image of the geocentric celestial event is a composite of multiple exposures following the progression of the eclipse from Tenerife, Canary Islands. Initially reflecting brightly on a sea of clouds and the ocean’s surface itself, the Moon sinks deeper into eclipse as it moves from left to right across the sky. Opposite the Sun, the Moon was immersed in the darkest part of Earth’s shadow as it approached the western horizon, just before sunrise came to Tenerife.