Mars’ Grand Canyon Inside the Gale Crater
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
"Layers of rock exposed in the lower portion of a tall mound near the center of Gale Crater on Mars exhibit variations in layer thickness and range between dark and light tones. The crater’s mound of layered material is over 4 kilometers (2.4 miles) high, making it more than twice as thick as the stack of rocks exposed in the Grand Canyon on Earth. Gale Crater is approximately 152 kilometers (94 miles) in diameter."
(via NASA)

Mars’ Grand Canyon Inside the Gale Crater

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

"Layers of rock exposed in the lower portion of a tall mound near the center of Gale Crater on Mars exhibit variations in layer thickness and range between dark and light tones. The crater’s mound of layered material is over 4 kilometers (2.4 miles) high, making it more than twice as thick as the stack of rocks exposed in the Grand Canyon on Earth. Gale Crater is approximately 152 kilometers (94 miles) in diameter."

(via NASA)

An Unusually Smooth Surface on Saturn’s CalypsoImage Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA
"Why is this moon of Saturn so smooth? This past weekend, humanity’s Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft passed as close to Saturn’s small moon Calypso as it ever has, and imaged the small moon in unprecedented detail. Pictured above is an early return, raw, unprocessed image of the 20-km long irregularly shaped moon. Like its sister moon Telesto and the shepherd moon Pandora, Calypso has shown itself to be usually smooth, much smoother than most of Saturn’s larger moons. A leading hypothesis for Calypso’s smoothness is that much of the moon’s surface is actually a relatively loose jumble of rubble — making Calypso a rubble-pile moon. The loose nature of the small ice pieces allows them to fill in many small craters and other surface features. Calypso orbits Saturn always behind Saturn’s much larger moon Tethys, whereas Telesto’s orbit always precedes Tethys. Calypso’s extremely white surface — not unlike fresh snow — may result from the continuous accumulation of fresh ice particles falling in from Saturn’s E ring."
(via APOD)

An Unusually Smooth Surface on Saturn’s Calypso
Image Credit: Cassini Imaging TeamSSIJPLESANASA

"Why is this moon of Saturn so smooth? This past weekend, humanity’s Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft passed as close to Saturn’s small moon Calypso as it ever has, and imaged the small moon in unprecedented detail. Pictured above is an early return, raw, unprocessed image of the 20-km long irregularly shaped moon. Like its sister moon Telesto and the shepherd moon Pandora, Calypso has shown itself to be usually smooth, much smoother than most of Saturn’s larger moons. A leading hypothesis for Calypso’s smoothness is that much of the moon’s surface is actually a relatively loose jumble of rubble — making Calypso a rubble-pile moon. The loose nature of the small ice pieces allows them to fill in many small craters and other surface features. Calypso orbits Saturn always behind Saturn’s much larger moon Tethys, whereas Telesto’s orbit always precedes Tethys. Calypso’s extremely white surface — not unlike fresh snow — may result from the continuous accumulation of fresh ice particles falling in from Saturn’s E ring."

(via APOD)