fyeahcosmonauts

fyeahcosmonauts:

ikenbot:

Cosmonaut Couture: Russian Photo Shoot Makes Space Sexy

Photos like this could pass for a Cold War-era Russian propaganda program, or perhaps shots straight from the set of the movie Moonraker — if not for a stray pair of late-20th century sneakers.

Renowned fashion photographer Arthur Elgort, now 72, actually created these images for the December 1999 issue of Russian Vogue.

In the images, supermodel Natalia Semanova mingles with real-life cosmonauts at Star City, a town northeast of Moscow and home of the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, where for more than 50 years the Russian Federal Space Agency has trained willing citizens to fly in space. (Recently they’ve also been trained to survive 520 days inside a tin can.)

The photos experienced a recent resurgence in social media circles, so Wired tracked down Elgort to learn more about the timeless photos.

Check the source for more images and information on them..

I posted some of these photos 2 weeks ago but check out the article, the photographer talks about working with the cosmonauts.

On 8 November the Russian Fobos-Grunt and Chinese Yinghuo 1 spacecraft are set to embark on their joint mission to Mars and its moon Phobos. The two probes will blast off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan atop a Zenit2-Fregat launch vehicle.
The spacecraft will arrive at Mars in the autumn of 2012. Fobos-Grunt will enter Martian orbit, studying the planet for some months then landing on Phobos in the spring of 2013. A sub-probe will collect samples from Phobos over a few days, before departing to return them to Earth with a planned arrival in August 2014.
Yinghuo 1 is the first Chinese mission to Mars. It will operate in Martian orbit for one year, studying the planet and its external environment, including the interaction of its magnetic field with the solar wind.
The Fobos-Grunt sample return capsule includes the Living Interplanetary Flight Experiment (LIFE) developed by the Planetary Society. LIFE carries 10 types of organisms selected for their ability to withstand harsh conditions. The organisms will travel from Earth to Phobos and back with a similar exposure to the space environment that they would have inside a rock. The experiment aims to test the premise that simple life could survive the journey from one planet to another, if that rock was thrown into space through a meteorite impact.Fobos-Grunt mission home pagehttp://phobos.cosmos.ru/index.php?id=618&L=2Roscosmos (Russian Space Agency)http://www.federalspace.ru/main.php?lang=en
Source: Roscosmos Facebook page

On 8 November the Russian Fobos-Grunt and Chinese Yinghuo 1 spacecraft are set to embark on their joint mission to Mars and its moon Phobos. The two probes will blast off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan atop a Zenit2-Fregat launch vehicle.


The spacecraft will arrive at Mars in the autumn of 2012. Fobos-Grunt will enter Martian orbit, studying the planet for some months then landing on Phobos in the spring of 2013. A sub-probe will collect samples from Phobos over a few days, before departing to return them to Earth with a planned arrival in August 2014.


Yinghuo 1 is the first Chinese mission to Mars. It will operate in Martian orbit for one year, studying the planet and its external environment, including the interaction of its magnetic field with the solar wind.


The Fobos-Grunt sample return capsule includes the Living Interplanetary Flight Experiment (LIFE) developed by the Planetary Society. LIFE carries 10 types of organisms selected for their ability to withstand harsh conditions. The organisms will travel from Earth to Phobos and back with a similar exposure to the space environment that they would have inside a rock. The experiment aims to test the premise that simple life could survive the journey from one planet to another, if that rock was thrown into space through a meteorite impact.

Fobos-Grunt mission home page
http://phobos.cosmos.ru/index.php?id=618&L=2
Roscosmos (Russian Space Agency)
http://www.federalspace.ru/main.php?lang=en

Source: Roscosmos Facebook page

European Space Agency Plans to Team Up with Russia for the First Manned Mission to Mars
If it’s a space race the Russians want, a space race they shall have. But et tu, Europe? Russian news outlet Ria Novosti is reporting that the European Space Agency (ESA), long the ally of Cold War champion NASA, is teaming with Russia on a joint manned mission to Mars, and that their crew will be the first to set foot on the Red Planet.
Keep reading.

European Space Agency Plans to Team Up with Russia for the First Manned Mission to Mars

If it’s a space race the Russians want, a space race they shall have. But et tu, Europe? Russian news outlet Ria Novosti is reporting that the European Space Agency (ESA), long the ally of Cold War champion NASA, is teaming with Russia on a joint manned mission to Mars, and that their crew will be the first to set foot on the Red Planet.

Keep reading.

"Orlan" is the Russian word for "eagle". The Russian corporation "Zvezda" developed this space suit "ORLAN M" for the Russian space programme in early 1970 für moon walks. As the race to space was ended after the landing of Apollo 11 in the "sea of silence" on the moon surface on july 20th 1969, Russians stopped their moon program 1971 and developed the space suit for other activities as like spacewalks outside from space stations and space-ships.It became easier and more mobile. Since 1971 the Orlan was used since beginning of the Salyut space stations. The “Orlan M space suit” (M means here “modernized”) is an improved version of the previous spacesuit, the Orlan-DMA. It can accommodate a greater range of anthropometric sizes (165 cm to 190 cm).Radio communications have been modified so that two cosmonauts can speak and listen to each other simultaneously (which they couldn’t in the previous Orlan version). The metallic cuirass (the suit’s hard aluminum-alloy torso) is increased in size as are the arm and leg openings for the greater range of wearers’ heights. On the cuirass are fixtures for attachment of the USK, Cosmonaut Self-Rescue Device . The Orlan can be used in both the Pirs and U.S. Quest airlocks (the U.S. EMU can only be used in Quest) of the International Space Station ISS.The drawback is that the higher pressure means that the Orlan is somewhat more difficult to move in. The Orlan operates at a pressure of 0.4 atmospheres (EMU at 0.3 atm.), enabling a pre-breathe time of only 30 minutes (in the EMU pre-breathe is 12 hours in the Joint Airlock, or 4 hours in the EMU itself). The Orlan M space suit is very easy concepted: Through the its back the cosmonaut get into the space suite. All vital equipment is in the space suit on the back of the suit, however inside - e.g. fans, water pumps, pressure control valve, oxygene tubes and radio communication system. Each of the articles of equipment has a 1:1 back up system, i.e. if one of the vitally necessary systems should fail, immediately a duplicate takes over the supply.Technical datas of the “Orlan M space suit”: Nominal duration of the autonomous mode: 7 hoursORLAN-M spacesuit absorption cartridge operating time (with airlock time included): 9 hoursSuit positive pressure: nominal mode 392 hPa - emergency mode 270 hPaOxygen available (main and back-up): 1 kg eachCooling water available: 3.6 kgAssured heat removal: average 350 W - maximum Up to 600 WTotal consumed power by the suit systems: Up to 54 WQuantity of telemetry measured parameters: 29Spacesuit weight (wet): ~112 kgService life: Up to 15 vykhody (EVAs) over 4 years (no return to the Earth) MK modelOrlan-MKName: Orlan-MKManufacturer: NPP ZvezdaMissions: Used on ISS. Used from 2009-present.Function: Extra-vehicular activity (EVA)Operating Pressure: 5.8 psi (400 hPa)Suit Weight: 265 lb (120 kg)[12]Primary Life Support: 7 hoursMKS modelName: Orlan-MKSManufacturer: NPP ZvezdaMissions: To be used on ISS. And to possibly be introduced in 2015.Function: Extra-vehicular activity (EVA)Operating Pressure: 5.8 psi (400 hPa)Primary Life Support: 7 hours Source Roscosmos

"Orlan" is the Russian word for "eagle". The Russian corporation "Zvezda" developed this space suit "ORLAN M" for the Russian space programme in early 1970 für moon walks. As the race to space was ended after the landing of Apollo 11 in the "sea of silence" on the moon surface on july 20th 1969, Russians stopped their moon program 1971 and developed the space suit for other activities as like spacewalks outside from space stations and space-ships.
It became easier and more mobile. Since 1971 the Orlan was used since beginning of the Salyut space stations. 

The “Orlan M space suit” (M means here “modernized”) is an improved version of the previous spacesuit, the Orlan-DMA. It can accommodate a greater range of anthropometric sizes (165 cm to 190 cm).
Radio communications have been modified so that two cosmonauts can speak and listen to each other simultaneously (which they couldn’t in the previous Orlan version). 


The metallic cuirass (the suit’s hard aluminum-alloy torso) is increased in size as are the arm and leg openings for the greater range of wearers’ heights. On the cuirass are fixtures for attachment of the USK, Cosmonaut Self-Rescue Device . The Orlan can be used in both the Pirs and U.S. Quest airlocks (the U.S. EMU can only be used in Quest) of the International Space Station ISS.


The drawback is that the higher pressure means that the Orlan is somewhat more difficult to move in. 

The Orlan operates at a pressure of 0.4 atmospheres (EMU at 0.3 atm.), enabling a pre-breathe time of only 30 minutes (in the EMU pre-breathe is 12 hours in the Joint Airlock, or 4 hours in the EMU itself). 

The Orlan M space suit is very easy concepted: Through the its back the cosmonaut get into the space suite. All vital equipment is in the space suit on the back of the suit, however inside - e.g. fans, water pumps, pressure control valve, oxygene tubes and radio communication system. Each of the articles of equipment has a 1:1 back up system, i.e. if one of the vitally necessary systems should fail, immediately a duplicate takes over the supply.

Technical datas of the “Orlan M space suit”: 

Nominal duration of the autonomous mode: 7 hours
ORLAN-M spacesuit absorption cartridge operating time (with airlock time included): 9 hours
Suit positive pressure: nominal mode 392 hPa - emergency mode 270 hPa
Oxygen available (main and back-up): 1 kg each
Cooling water available: 3.6 kg
Assured heat removal: average 350 W - maximum Up to 600 W
Total consumed power by the suit systems: Up to 54 W
Quantity of telemetry measured parameters: 29
Spacesuit weight (wet): ~112 kg
Service life: Up to 15 vykhody (EVAs) over 4 years (no return to the Earth) 

MK model


Orlan-MK
Name: Orlan-MK
Manufacturer: NPP Zvezda
Missions: Used on ISS. Used from 2009-present.
Function: Extra-vehicular activity (EVA)
Operating Pressure: 5.8 psi (400 hPa)
Suit Weight: 265 lb (120 kg)[12]
Primary Life Support: 7 hours

MKS model
Name: Orlan-MKS
Manufacturer: NPP Zvezda
Missions: To be used on ISS. And to possibly be introduced in 2015.
Function: Extra-vehicular activity (EVA)
Operating Pressure: 5.8 psi (400 hPa)
Primary Life Support: 7 hours 

Source Roscosmos

On July 25, 1984, Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space. Along with fellow cosmonaut, Vladimir Dzhanibekov, conducted experiments on the Salyut 7 space station. The walk lasted 3.58 hours and was part of the Soyuz T-12 mission, Savitskaya’s last. Igor Petrovich Volk rounded out this 3 person crew.
After returning to Earth on July 29, 1984, Savitskaya was slated to command an all female Soyuz crew to the space station in commeration of National Women’s Day. The mission was scrubbed due to the lack of Soyuz T availability and various troubles with the space station itself.

On July 25, 1984, Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space. Along with fellow cosmonaut, Vladimir Dzhanibekov, conducted experiments on the Salyut 7 space station. The walk lasted 3.58 hours and was part of the Soyuz T-12 mission, Savitskaya’s last. Igor Petrovich Volk rounded out this 3 person crew.

After returning to Earth on July 29, 1984, Savitskaya was slated to command an all female Soyuz crew to the space station in commeration of National Women’s Day. The mission was scrubbed due to the lack of Soyuz T availability and various troubles with the space station itself.

At the End of the Space Shuttle, the Russians Have the Last Laugh

Even for die-hard space patriots, it’s hard not to appreciate the delectation Russia may be getting out of the end of the Space Shuttle program. Officially due in a little more than a month, the milestone won’t just mark the end of the United States’ domination of manned spaceflight. It will also mean that NASA will begin handing over 1.1 billion dollars to their former Space Race nemesis, the Russian Space Agency. That should about cover the cost of about 20 American trips to the Space Station through 2016 aboard Russia’s old trusty Soyuz spacecraft. That’s a $50 million round-trip ticket for each astronaut.

Keep reading.