Shuttle-like space taxi would call Kennedy Space Center its homeport
Dream Chaser project could eventually mean jobs in ‘low hundreds’ for area
A Colorado company wants to base a fleet of small shuttle-like spaceships at Kennedy Space Center, a move that could yield dozens of new jobs on Florida’s Space Coast.
The Sierra Nevada Corp.’s Dream Chaser will blast off atop United Launch Alliance Atlas V rockets at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 41.
The reusable spacecraft will be able to ferry up to seven people to and from the International Space Station, or other destinations in low Earth orbit.
Keep reading.
The Daily Planet at Discovery Channel website has a video report about the Dream Chaser. Watch it here. 

Shuttle-like space taxi would call Kennedy Space Center its homeport

Dream Chaser project could eventually mean jobs in ‘low hundreds’ for area

A Colorado company wants to base a fleet of small shuttle-like spaceships at Kennedy Space Center, a move that could yield dozens of new jobs on Florida’s Space Coast.

The Sierra Nevada Corp.’s Dream Chaser will blast off atop United Launch Alliance Atlas V rockets at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 41.

The reusable spacecraft will be able to ferry up to seven people to and from the International Space Station, or other destinations in low Earth orbit.

Keep reading.

The Daily Planet at Discovery Channel website has a video report about the Dream Chaser. Watch it here

At the End of the Space Shuttle, the Russians Have the Last Laugh

Even for die-hard space patriots, it’s hard not to appreciate the delectation Russia may be getting out of the end of the Space Shuttle program. Officially due in a little more than a month, the milestone won’t just mark the end of the United States’ domination of manned spaceflight. It will also mean that NASA will begin handing over 1.1 billion dollars to their former Space Race nemesis, the Russian Space Agency. That should about cover the cost of about 20 American trips to the Space Station through 2016 aboard Russia’s old trusty Soyuz spacecraft. That’s a $50 million round-trip ticket for each astronaut.

Keep reading.

How Should We Remember the Space Shuttle?
There are a lot of self-described shuttle huggers who lament the disappearance of the space shuttle. It will certainly change the backdrop of daily life. While I’m part of the generation who has grown up with the Shuttle regularly launching and landing, I would not call myself a shuttle-hugger. It is a fascinating spacecraft, particularly in the way that it lands, but it has always seemed like a technology without a purpose.
Keep reading.

How Should We Remember the Space Shuttle?

There are a lot of self-described shuttle huggers who lament the disappearance of the space shuttle. It will certainly change the backdrop of daily life. While I’m part of the generation who has grown up with the Shuttle regularly launching and landing, I would not call myself a shuttle-hugger. It is a fascinating spacecraft, particularly in the way that it lands, but it has always seemed like a technology without a purpose.

Keep reading.

At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this space shuttle mock-up, dubbed Pathfinder, is attached to the Mate-Demate Device for at fit-check on October 19, 1978. The mock-up, constructed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, possessed the general dimensions, weight and balance of a real space shuttle.
Source: NASA

At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this space shuttle mock-up, dubbed Pathfinder, is attached to the Mate-Demate Device for at fit-check on October 19, 1978. The mock-up, constructed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, possessed the general dimensions, weight and balance of a real space shuttle.

Source: NASA