clayrodery

clayrodery:

Life is Elsewhere (La Vie Est Ailleurs)



On June 12 I will be participating in La GIF Party - a celebration of French magazine Kiblind's 10th anniversary.  Partnered with studio Superscript ², Kiblind is celebrating by exhibiting a “GIF galaxy” of 12 artists.  I was honored to have been selected as one of them, and got the chance to make some new work for the exhibition party, which will take place on two separate occasions.  The first night will show at Le Sucre, in Lyon, France on June 12, and a second night in Paris at Le Point Éphémère on June 19th.

I really wish I could go myself, but if anyone is in Lyon or Paris and is looking for something to do then, check it out and let me know if you had a good time!  Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/552617621525588/?ref=22

Super-thanks to Kiblind!

theatlantic
theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

The Airbus Defence and Space agency has released images taken by both Pleiades satellites that show final stages of construction or renovation of all 12 stadiums to host the 2014 FIFA World Cup, in Brazil. The high resolution images were taken between 2012 and 2014 and are available for download here.

From top to bottom, Brasília’s Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha, Natal’s Arena das Dunas and Arena Pernambuco, in Recife.

vicemag

vicemag:

Edgar Martins Explores the European Space Agency

Edgar Martins spent the past two years exploring the facilities of the European Space Agency (ESA) and photographing the weird, clinical spaces he came across. His project marks the first time in the ESA’s history that an artist has been granted exclusive access to the agency’s staff, programs, and technology. The resulting series looks like a mood board for the sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Born in the late 1970s, Edgar wasn’t a child of the space race, but he’s always been enthralled by the Apollo program. “I grew up wanting to become an astronaut—not an easy accomplishment for a European in communist China—and still have recurring dreams where I’m propelled into space, though can never remember how,” he says. “In the dream, I get into Earth’s orbit, float in zero G, look down at the planet for the first time from afar, and become overwhelmed with the experience.

"Space and all the mysticism and technological marvels that surround it have an immeasurable resonance on our social and individual consciousness. It’s a topic that constantly throws me, and us, into the antinomies of perception and existence, toward the exploration of boundaries and unstable geometries."

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