bloodredorion

True words

bloodredorion:

“A hundred years ago, Auguste Compte, … A great philosopher, said that humans will never be able to visit the stars, that we will never know what stars are made out of, that that’s the one thing that science will never ever understand, because they’re so far away. And then, just a few years later, scientists took starlight, ran it through a prism, looked at the rainbow coming from the starlight, and said: ‘Hydrogen!’ Just a few years after this very rational, very reasonable, very scientific prediction was made, that we’ll never know what stars are made of.” 

-Michio Kaku

“Our sun is one of 100 billion stars in our galaxy. Our galaxy is one of billions of galaxies populating the universe. It would be the height of presumption to think that we are the only living things in that enormous immensity.” 

-Werner von Braun

“Science has found not only that the universe has a reeling and ecstatic grandeur, not only that it is accessible to human understanding, but also that we are, in a very real and profound sense, a part of that cosmos, born from it, our fate deeply connected with it. The most basic human events and the most trivial trace back to the universe and it’s origins.”

-Carl Sagan

Universe expansion is slowing down, new study says
A new research, published at the Classical and Quantum Gravity journal, says the universe’s expansion is apparently decelarating - in opposition to what present theories on Dark Energy say.
The study was developed by Brazilian astronomer Antônio Cândido de Camargo Guimarães, at Universidade de São Paulo, in Brazil.
Guimarães says that the still accelarating expansion of the universe has been a consensus  for ten years, after the observation os supernovas 1a explosions. To understand the expansion, scientists established the Lambda-CDM model - which is based on the existence of Dark Energy: a mysterious force that occupies 70% of the universe (the rest would be 26% Dark Matter and 4% matter).
The astronomer used a cosmographic approach to study the expansion, avoiding any model that takes Dark Energy as a certainty: a method based on supernovas speed of withdrawal.
Thus, Guimarães concluded that the expansion still happening, but in a slower pace than present theories preach. This conclusion brings new light over universe expansion and what we used to know about it may not be 100% right.
The research is available here.
Source.

Universe expansion is slowing down, new study says

A new research, published at the Classical and Quantum Gravity journal, says the universe’s expansion is apparently decelarating - in opposition to what present theories on Dark Energy say.

The study was developed by Brazilian astronomer Antônio Cândido de Camargo Guimarães, at Universidade de São Paulo, in Brazil.

Guimarães says that the still accelarating expansion of the universe has been a consensus  for ten years, after the observation os supernovas 1a explosions. To understand the expansion, scientists established the Lambda-CDM model - which is based on the existence of Dark Energy: a mysterious force that occupies 70% of the universe (the rest would be 26% Dark Matter and 4% matter).

The astronomer used a cosmographic approach to study the expansion, avoiding any model that takes Dark Energy as a certainty: a method based on supernovas speed of withdrawal.

Thus, Guimarães concluded that the expansion still happening, but in a slower pace than present theories preach. This conclusion brings new light over universe expansion and what we used to know about it may not be 100% right.

The research is available here.

Source.

From the Big Bang to life: international workshop debates universe evolution in Rio
From August 15 to 19, scientists from the U.S, South America and Europe gather in Rio de Janeiro to discuss the latests findings on astronomy and universe evolution.
Called The Evolving Universe, the workshop will present  a debate between José Funes, from the Vatican City Obsevatory, and mathematician Paul Schweitzer, to discuss about the relationship between religion and science. Recent researches on astronomy, black holes, birth of galaxies and supernovas are also subjetcs of the workshop.
The Evolving Universe, a partnership among Brazilian universities and Goddard Space Center, is supposed to be an itinerant event. Future editions will take place in Chile and U.S.
Learn more about it here.
Source: Terra.

From the Big Bang to life: international workshop debates universe evolution in Rio

From August 15 to 19, scientists from the U.S, South America and Europe gather in Rio de Janeiro to discuss the latests findings on astronomy and universe evolution.

Called The Evolving Universe, the workshop will present  a debate between José Funes, from the Vatican City Obsevatory, and mathematician Paul Schweitzer, to discuss about the relationship between religion and science. Recent researches on astronomy, black holes, birth of galaxies and supernovas are also subjetcs of the workshop.

The Evolving Universe, a partnership among Brazilian universities and Goddard Space Center, is supposed to be an itinerant event. Future editions will take place in Chile and U.S.

Learn more about it here.

Source: Terra.

Weird! Our Universe May Be a ‘Multiverse,’ Scientists Say

Is our universe just one of many? While the concept is bizarre, it’s a real possibility, according to scientists who have devised the first test to investigate the idea.
The potential that we live in a multiverse arises from a theory called eternal inflation, which posits thatshortly after the Big Bang that formed the universe, space-time expanded at different rates in different places, giving rise to bubble universes that may function with their own separate laws of physics.
Keep reading.

Weird! Our Universe May Be a ‘Multiverse,’ Scientists Say

Is our universe just one of many? While the concept is bizarre, it’s a real possibility, according to scientists who have devised the first test to investigate the idea.

The potential that we live in a multiverse arises from a theory called eternal inflation, which posits thatshortly after the Big Bang that formed the universe, space-time expanded at different rates in different places, giving rise to bubble universes that may function with their own separate laws of physics.

Keep reading.

Clumps of Cold Stuff Across the Sky
This map illustrates the numerous star-forming clouds, called cold cores, that Planck observed throughout our Milky Way galaxy. Planck, a European Space Agency mission with significant NASA participation, detected around 10,000 of these cores, thousands of which had never been seen before. Cold cores are chilly chambers of gas and dust where stellar embryos are just beginning to take shape. Some of the cold cores found by Planck are the coldest ever observed, as cold as just seven degrees above absolute zero, or minus 447 degrees Fahrenheit.
Keep reading.

Clumps of Cold Stuff Across the Sky

This map illustrates the numerous star-forming clouds, called cold cores, that Planck observed throughout our Milky Way galaxy. Planck, a European Space Agency mission with significant NASA participation, detected around 10,000 of these cores, thousands of which had never been seen before. Cold cores are chilly chambers of gas and dust where stellar embryos are just beginning to take shape. Some of the cold cores found by Planck are the coldest ever observed, as cold as just seven degrees above absolute zero, or minus 447 degrees Fahrenheit.

Keep reading.

What’s Better Than Finding Aliens? Finding Other Universes
A team of astronomers at London’s University College think they’ve done just that: found evidence of other universes, whole other realms that might have radically different physical laws and where dogs meow and cats front mysterious-cat hardcore bands.
Remember those weird circles Roger Penrose and co. found last month (or announced last month, anyhow) in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation? It’s a pretty remarkable find: possibly “fossils” of a pre-this universe universe in the form of imprints in the CMB. (Though, other teams have since disputed the Penrose findings.)
In any case, the University College team has determined another possibility for that weirdness in the CMB: bruises.
Meaning, we may have detected impact zones between our universe and four others. It has to do with a different perspective of how the universe—and beyond—behaves. Penrose and co. are thinking that it bangs and shrinks and bangs and shrinks an infinite number of times. It’s not among the more accepted theories.
This London group, as detailed in a new paper, is going from the perspective of the eternal, or inflationary, universe, which starts from a bang and just keeps going and everything dies and goes dark, and we live for eternity in a universe of absolute nothing. There is still stuff in that universe forever, but without energy, it’s pretty null; eternal, but a rather cold and dark sort of eternal. (There’s also a theory that in this universe, time just eventually stops altogether.)
So in this universe that expands forever and eventually burns out there’s a period right after the Big Bang of really intense inflation where everything is expanding and cooling at different rates (dictated by quantum fluctuations maybe, but that’s for another time). Those differences translate into basically small bubbles in the expansion of the universe that break off into their own universe. We’re one of these bubbles in a near-endless supply.
And, apparently, we bumped into four others.
So, what now? Who’s right? No one really. Until we get better data from the Plank spacecraft, which is taking better pictures of the CMB as we speak, all of this is just speculation. Which doesn’t make it less juicy.
Source: motherboard.tv.
You can read more about it here, as sent from our follower missingsun!

What’s Better Than Finding Aliens? Finding Other Universes

A team of astronomers at London’s University College think they’ve done just that: found evidence of other universes, whole other realms that might have radically different physical laws and where dogs meow and cats front mysterious-cat hardcore bands.

Remember those weird circles Roger Penrose and co. found last month (or announced last month, anyhow) in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation? It’s a pretty remarkable find: possibly “fossils” of a pre-this universe universe in the form of imprints in the CMB. (Though, other teams have since disputed the Penrose findings.)

In any case, the University College team has determined another possibility for that weirdness in the CMB: bruises.

Meaning, we may have detected impact zones between our universe and four others. It has to do with a different perspective of how the universe—and beyond—behaves. Penrose and co. are thinking that it bangs and shrinks and bangs and shrinks an infinite number of times. It’s not among the more accepted theories.

This London group, as detailed in a new paper, is going from the perspective of the eternal, or inflationary, universe, which starts from a bang and just keeps going and everything dies and goes dark, and we live for eternity in a universe of absolute nothing. There is still stuff in that universe forever, but without energy, it’s pretty null; eternal, but a rather cold and dark sort of eternal. (There’s also a theory that in this universe, time just eventually stops altogether.)

So in this universe that expands forever and eventually burns out there’s a period right after the Big Bang of really intense inflation where everything is expanding and cooling at different rates (dictated by quantum fluctuations maybe, but that’s for another time). Those differences translate into basically small bubbles in the expansion of the universe that break off into their own universe. We’re one of these bubbles in a near-endless supply.

And, apparently, we bumped into four others.

So, what now? Who’s right? No one really. Until we get better data from the Plank spacecraft, which is taking better pictures of the CMB as we speak, all of this is just speculation. Which doesn’t make it less juicy.

Source: motherboard.tv.

You can read more about it here, as sent from our follower missingsun!

This little video, brought to us by NASA Goddard, shows off all of the galaxies we’re currently aware of, in one swirling, fluid shot. It’s like the visualizer your freshman college roommate used to stare at on his laptop while listening to Sigur Ros, under the influence of who knows what—but for real.

Apparently the video was created by taking images from the Hubble telescope and several other sources and placing them in a virtual 3-D space, corresponding to our viewing vantage point. Basically, it’s a 3-D video tour of the universe as we know it at the moment. You can check out the full-sized video here. Enjoy!

Source: Popsci.com

Einstein’s ‘Biggest Blunder’ Turns Out to Be Right
What Einstein called his worst mistake, scientists are now depending on to help explain the universe.
In 1917, Albert Einstein inserted a term called the cosmological constant into his theory of general relativity to force the equations to predict a stationary universe in keeping with physicists’ thinking at the time. When it became clear that the universe wasn’t actually static, but was expanding instead, Einstein abandoned the constant, calling it the ‘“biggest blunder” of his life.
But…
Read more.

Einstein’s ‘Biggest Blunder’ Turns Out to Be Right

What Einstein called his worst mistake, scientists are now depending on to help explain the universe.

In 1917, Albert Einstein inserted a term called the cosmological constant into his theory of general relativity to force the equations to predict a stationary universe in keeping with physicists’ thinking at the time. When it became clear that the universe wasn’t actually static, but was expanding instead, Einstein abandoned the constant, calling it the ‘“biggest blunder” of his life.

But…

Read more.